Celebrating Alderney’s Maritime History

Celebrating Alderney’s Maritime History

When we think of the tiny island of Alderney, in the Channel Islands, we probably think of the gorgeous coastline and sandy beaches, picturesque town centre and notoriously warm climate – basically all the things that make it a popular tourist destination.

Fort Clonque

Fort Clonque, Alderney

Visitors are charmed by the Alderney train, the lighthouse and the bell tower of St. Anne’s church, while others head for the historic fortifications that pepper the island, including the best preserved small Roman fort in Britain, and the extensive structures that were left behind after the German occupation in WW2. These fortifications hint at Alderney’s rich maritime history and heritage. As the northernmost inhabited island of the British Channel Islands, and the closest to France, the island has been seen as strategically important for centuries.

The Henry Euler Memorial Trust – a charity dedicated to the research, interpretation and presentation of this maritime history – are hosting an international Symposium and exhibition in Alderney on the 5th and 6th of September 2019.

The Symposium will focus on gaining an understanding of the island’s role in Anglo-French relations between 1689 and 1918. There will be a full programme of lectures, discussion and presentations over the two-day event, which aims to complement existing scholarship by examining the connection between the island’s strategically important location and local expertise, resources and bases.

Essex Castle, Alderney

Essex Castle, Alderney

If you’re keen for a bit of late winter sun, what better than to combine it with some fascinating local history with a global impact? Zambuni PR has been working with The Henry Euler Memorial Trust to create a new website, where you can find full details of the symposium, as well as learn more about the Trust, its founder, namesake and aims.

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